A Tiny Thing - Georgie At Three Months



The last month of our lives have been rather crazy, and a lot of that craziness is surrounding my sweet Georgie Bea.

Growth And Eating

In late January I finally took in Georgie for an overdue two month checkup.  I was excited to see how much she had grown!  She seemed like such a tiny thing, I was curious to see her percentages.  Nevertheless I was still surprised to learn that she had only gained 11 ounces since her two week checkup.  

In case you are not familiar with the weight gain curves that doctors use, that is not so good!  She had dropped completely off the chart, below the first percentile.  In the week leading up to our appointment I noticed she still seemed so tiny and delicate, but she seemed healthy and content, and she was hitting all of her milestones. I honestly didn't realize she hadn't been gaining weight.  I still feel a little guilty about this.

Enter "Operation: Fatten Up Georgie".  For the next week I fed her every two hours and topped her off with formula at least twice a day.  Whatever I did seemed to work, and a week later when we went in for a weight check she was up to 10 pounds, 2 ounces at 3 months old! She's still tiny, but her weight is moving in the right direction, so that's good.  

In retrospect, I think her not gaining enough weight can be attributed to a "perfect storm" of a few different factors:

1. Georgie sleeps about 12 hours at night.  This is completely amazing for obvious reasons, but it was not helping her in the weight gain department.
2.  Because she sleeps so long at night, my supply had been dwindling.  However, this was so gradual that I didn't notice it until the last couple weeks when it became a problem.
3. My milk wasn't letting down properly.  I have five kids, and it's hard to find a quiet time to feed Georgie where we won't be interrupted.  I think this was making it hard for me to relax enough for my milk to letdown, which contributed to my supply issues.
4. On a normal day, Georgie is an extremely content baby, and she just wasn't letting me know when she was hungry.  I was feeding her at three hour intervals or so, but she needs more than that right now.  We now officially have her on a timer.

We'll have another weight check in the next couple weeks, but I am very confident that she is gaining weight happily now.  Her face has gotten notably rounder, and she even has a double chin.  She's even chubbed up since her three month pictures that I recently shared on Instagram!  Unfortunately my supply continues to dwindle, and I just don't have time or motivation to add pumping into an already packed day, so we've been giving her 2-3 bottles of formula each day.  We didn't make it as long as I wanted to with exclusively nursing this time, but c'est la vie. I'll just be happy if we can at least partially nurse until six months at this point.

As you can imagine, it's hard to keep up on things when you have five kids to take care of and one of them needs to be fed every two hours, hence why this post is late.  Aside from her weight, Georgie has been changing and growing in so many ways this month!



Sleeping

As I mentioned, Miss Georgie is an amazing sleeper!  She goes 12 hours at night, and I intend to enjoy this as much as possible.  I'm fairly confident she will stop sleeping through the night around four months because all of my babies have gone through a growth spurt at four months.  She also takes one afternoon nap during the day (having only one daytime nap is my tradeoff for a full night's sleep - I'll take it!).

Firsts

The day we found out Georgie wasn't gaining weight (January 25th), she laughed at me.  I can't tell you how comforting that was to me - right when I was beating myself up for not realizing she wasn't growing on track, she blessed me with sweet baby giggles.  It's a cute little belly-chuckle sound. She's mostly just laughed for me so far (and once for Derek), when I tickle her tummy.  I got the best video of her laughing at me repeatedly for a minute straight, and I rewatch it sometimes when I need a grin.  I just love her laugh so much!

She also discovered her hands.  One day I had her laying on the bed in my room while I got ready to go somewhere, and I looked over at her and she was just starting so intently at her hands.  I always find this phase so funny!  It's so cute to watch her little quizzical expression as she tries to figure things out.

We also celebrated our first New Year's with Georgie, and went to the stock show together for the first time as a family of 7.

She still rolls over both ways, but only occasionally.  However, she's such a strong little thing!  Her head support is pretty good for her age, and she pushes up with her arms really well when we do tummy time.



Personality

As I said, Georgie is mostly a very content baby, though since we've been feeding her every two hours she has gotten a little more vocal.  I think she finally realized she likes to eat.  She has the sweetest little grin, and she smiles much more quickly now than she did a month ago.  Her dimples are just the best thing ever!  I can also tell she's getting a little more attached to me - When someone else is holding her she will just stare at me and follow me around with her eyes.  She doesn't talk too often, but when she does it's the cutest little cooing/sighing sound.  If you want to hear her talk you have to stare right into her eyes and talk to her, and then she'll wait for a break in the conversation to coo back at you.  

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Georgiana Bea, 

You threw me for a loop this month!  I can't believe how tiny you are, but your sweet little grins and baby talk reassure me always that you are doing just fine.  You are such a happy baby! Your grins light up my whole day, and I'm a tiny bit obsessed with your dimples.  I sit with you sometimes and just try to get you to smile over and over so I can catch a glimpse of them.  And don't even get me started on your laugh.  Your baby giggle puts both your dad and me in stitches - we just can't help but laugh along with you!  What a sweet little joy you are.  I can't imagine our life or family without you, my little lady.  You live up to your name.

I love you always, 

Mama



My Firstborn At Seven



Wyatt Boy, yesterday you turned seven years old.

Your birthday could have snuck up on me this year except for the fact that you have been reminding me about it for the last few months.  You are big enough now to sit down with a calendar and figure out how many days there are until things, and you were counting down the days.  This is also the first year that you had plans for you own birthday, and I tried my best to fill all your hopes with what I had.  You were so sweet and enthusiastic, in your quiet, shy way, about everything we ended up doing.

We took you to the Nature and Science museum, and walked through the gem section with you.  You are fascinated by the idea that such beautiful things can just be waiting beneath the earth for someone to come dig them up.  We took you to the gift shop and bought you some rocks for you "gem collection", and I loved seeing your face light up.  You wanted to know all the technical names, and how the gems were formed, and whether they were "real rocks" or manmade.  You are my thinker, and you love to just know things, especially anything related to physical science or biology.  You can stare for hours at books filled with birds, insects, and animals, and you always want to know how things work.

This year whenever you were asked what you wanted to be, you always replied with "a farmer and a worker".  You have been scoping out land as we drive places, trying to figure out where you could buy a farm.  But over the last month you've been talking more about being a "worker".  You want to build things.  We bought you a bunch of Legos this year, and seeing your how creativity grows is amazing.  You and your dad have built several things together, and I know that's one of his dreams for his kids come true, to sit and do Legos together with his son (and also go to a college football game together, which you also did this fall!).

We started first grade this year, and I don't think I expected to see you grow so much when we first cracked the books last summer.  You are learning so much!  It's so fun for me to see things start to make sense to you, to see how much you are learning each day.  You actually love to learn, and in that I see myself in you again.  I expect many years ahead of bonding over biology and zoology textbooks, since you seem to especially enjoy that subject just like I do.



One thing I love about you is your desire to do the right thing, and your desire for people to know about Jesus.  At Christmas time you made a little card in your Sunday School class that you were supposed to give to someone to tell them about Jesus.  If it were me, I would have completely forgotten about it, but you carried that card around in your pocket, scanning the stores to see who you might give it to.  You finally gave it to our cashier at the mall, and I'm pretty sure you made her day.  But I saw the serious look on your face as you asked her if she knew about Jesus, and my heart melted a little.  My sweet boy, I love the desire you have for others to know the Truth.  I pray you will never lose that.

Do you know how incredibly proud I am to be your mom?  You are a joy to me, Wyatt.  I love you so much, from that first moment I laid eyes on you seven years ago, and more every day.  It's a privilege to call you my son.

Love Always,

Mama

Evangelism Is Scary



Confession: I've been a Christian for over 20 years, but I struggle with evangelism.  A lot.  I know I'm not alone in this, because I've recently heard a statistic that only 2% of the church shares their faith on a regular basis.  Yikes!  That's embarrassing.

I like to think that sharing the gospel in written form on this blog counts for something, but let's be honest, if I really are about those around me who are headed for Hell, I should be willing to speak up in person too.  But I get scared, and I don't know what to say.  It's a problem.  I've been feeling convicted about this for a couple years, but it's so hard to know where to start.

After praying about this for a while, I feel like the Lord brought a couple resources into my life in the last few months that are making me feel a lot less terrified of evangelizing.  I was going to share about all this in one of my life update posts, but then I thought, hey, evangelism is an important enough topic that it certainly deserves it's own post.  And I know some of you out there have the same struggles as me.  Speak up in the comments!


Resource #1 - Wretched Radio

In December we started listening to a podcast called Wretched Radio.  Derek and I are officially hooked now.  Todd Friel, the host, has a sarcastic sense of humor that is entertaining, but the meat of his ministry is all tied back to the importance of the gospel and evangelism.  We don't always agree with his style or word choice, but he's very grounded on God's word.  Each week he does a "Witness Wednesday" episode, where he gets random people on the radio and witnesses to them right there.  Just hearing how someone else witnesses to people, in real conversations, has made me feel so much more prepared for the moment when I might get a chance to witness to someone myself.  And feeling prepared is half the battle, right?

Resource #2 - Living Waters

On a related note, Friel started this part of the podcast with Ray Comfort, who has a whole Youtube channel where he witnesses to strangers.  His boldness in sharing the gospel is so inspiring, and makes the whole thing seem less scary and more doable.  Derek and I could sit for hours and watch his witnessing videos.  You can see all those here, but be prepared to get sucked in for a ridiculous amount of time.

Resource #3 - Successful Christian Parenting by John MacArthur

I've mentioned Successful Christian Parenting before, but this is my go-to book for refocusing on evangelizing my children - who are the people I want to point to the Lord the most, for obvious reasons!  That's really the whole point of Christian parenting.  I think this book would be great in particular for anyone who has children in their life that they want to lead to Jesus, even if you aren't a parent yet, and the approach he explains in this book would be helpful in witnessing to someone of any age.  I'm reading it again this year.

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Evangelism is one of those things that I think a lot of us put off because we don't think we have the "gift" of evangelism.  But the thing about spiritual gifts is that they are often things that we are supposed to do whether we have a "gift" for it or not.  We're all supposed to be practicing discernment, hospitality, mercy, etc.  And we're all supposed to be evangelizing.  Plus, this is purely a guess, but I imagine that since we know God is not willing that any should perish but all should come to repentance (2 Peter 3:9), He probably has gifted more than 2% of the church with the gift of evangelism...and maybe a lot of us just don't realize it because we're too scared or lazy to give it a try.

That would be me. But I'm working on it, and I wanted to encourage my fellow sisters in Christ to work on it too.  Checking out these resources is an easy place to start.

Do you have a hard time with evangelism too?  Are you trying to work on it?  What resources have helped you?






The Year Of Reading Challenges - Book List For 2018



I don't really make New Year's resolutions, and I kind of gave up on the word-of-the-year thing (for now at least).  But one thing I do enjoy is making reading goals for the year!  You all know how much I love books, so these kinds of New Year goals are less burdensome and more fun.

I have three basic goals for this year:



3. Read 75 books this year.

I read a lot of books anyway, so 75 books won't be too much of a stress.  It comes out to about one more book a month, which I'm hoping will challenge me to spend those spare moments less on scrolling my phone and more on flipping through pages on my Kindle.  But looking at my reading list over the last year, I think I could increase the quality of the books I read.  I'm hoping participating in both of these challenges will help me pay more attention to the kind of books I'm reading, so I can make sure I'm actually growing in some way from my reading.  I especially hope to read better quality fiction books (even though I know I'll still have some light reads on the fiction side, because sometimes you just need some chick lit).  Here are the categories for both of these challenges, and my preliminary picks (which I can almost guarantee will change, but it's good to have a plan).


Jaime Balmet's Christian Women Reading Challenge

I listen to Jaime's podcast and really enjoy it, and I'm looking forward to her reading podcast that will start sometime this year!  Her challenge focuses mostly on Christian non-fiction, and I'm hoping to read some winners in these categories this year!

Practical Homemaking - Three Books

1. Hello Mornings by Kat Lee (already completed, see review here).
2. The More Of Less by Josh Becker (I own the audiobook.)
3. How To Manage Your Home Without Losing Your Mind by Dana White

Biblical Womanhood/Marriage - Three Books

1. Housewife Theologian: How The Gospel Interrupts The Ordinary by Aimee Byrd
2. Twelve Extraordinary Women by John MacArthur
3. Women Living Well by Courtney Joseph

Parenting/Family Life - Four Books

1. Why I Didn't Rebel by Rebecca Lindenbach (completed - I'll count it here, but it wasn't my favorite. See review here.)
2. Reset For Parents by Todd Friel
3. 30 Ways To Save Your Family In 30 Days by Rebecca Hagelin
4. Six Ways To Keep The Good In Your Boy by Dannah Gresh (I read the companion to this one about girls and it was great.)

5. Successful Christian Parenting by John MacArthur or Loving The Little Years by Rachel Jankovic (Bonus books since the first book in this category wasn't my favorite.  Both would be re-reads - I know they're good!)

Christian Living - Six Books

1.  You Are What You Love by James K.A. Smith (I already started this book and it is excellent!)
2. Adopted For Life by Russel Moore (I own this one and have wanted to read it for a while.)
3. Respectable Sins by Jerry Bridges
4.  How Then Shall We Live? by Chuck Colson  (I own it, haven't read it.)
5.  Brass Heavens: Reasons For Unanswered Prayer by Paul Tautges
6. Glimpses Of Grace by Gloria Furman (I own it, but I'm not sure if I'm a fan of Furman's style.  I'll give this one a try.)

Theology - Four Books

1. None Like Him by Jen Wilkin (To buy!  I really liked the other book I read by Wilkin, and her Bible studies are great.)
2. Your God Is Too Small by J. B. Phillips (A classic my pastor mentioned years ago that I have wanted to read.)
3. Expository Listening by Ken Ramey
4. The Work Of Christ by R.C. Sproul


Biography - Two Books

1. A Hobbit, A Wardrobe, And A Great War by Joseph Loconte
2. Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxes (I have the audiobook, which is an ideal way to get through biographies in my opinion.)

Finances - Two Books

1. More Than Just Making It by Erin Odom (Started it, great so far.)
2. Love Your Life Not Theirs by Rachel Cruz

Christian Classic - One Book

1. Out Of The Silent Planet by C.S. Lewis (the one fiction book on this list, but it counts, right?)

Church History - One Book

1. Still trying to figure this one out.  Suggestions?



Modern Mrs Darcy Challenge

Anne's blog is probably the most prominent book blog out there.  This reading challenge looked fun - I decided to add this challenge into the mix this year since it seems to be more conducive to picking fiction.  Here are her categories, and what I might pick for each.

A Classic You've Been Meaning To Read

-So many choices...I will probably either go with A Tree Grows In Brooklyn or To Kill A Mockingbird.

A Book Recommended By Someone With Great Taste

-Throw me some suggestions, people!

A Book In Translation

-I'm struggling with this one.  I'm thinking of trying My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante.

A Book Nominated For An Award In 2018

-To be determined when the nominations are actually made.  But I'll probably be going for a Newberry because I like Children's books for this category since I think they will have less of a chance of being political statements.

A Book Of Poetry, A Play, Or An Essay Collection

-I'm strongly considering tackling a Shakespeare play, since I've never actually read Shakespeare.  Have any of you?

A Book You Can Read In A Day

-I'm just going to fill this in with Love And First Sight by Josh Sundquist, since I already read it and it's definitely doable in a day.  Read my review here.

A Book That's More Than 500 Pages

-Started The Brother's Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, which could also technically count for "a book in translation".  I'm planning on reading a chapter a day until I finish it, which is absolutely doable.  This book is more interesting so far than I thought it would be!

A Book By A Favorite Author

-Definitely The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton, which was a gift for Christmas from my dear friend Felicia!  

A Book Recommended By A Librarian Or Bookseller

-To be determined when I get up the nerve to actually ask a librarian for a recommendation.

A Banned Book

-Either To Kill A Mockingbird or Fahrenheit 411, both of which I've started and haven't finished because of my bookish ADD.

A Memoir, Biography, Or Book Of Creative Non-Fiction

-It is very likely this category will change, but I'm hoping to either do Fierce Convictions by Karen Swallow Prior (about Hannah Moore) or John Adams by David McCullough.

A Book By An Author Of A Different Race/Ethnicity/Religion Than You

-I've been wanting to read more stories from people who escaped North Korea, so I'll be going with The Girl With Seven Names by Hyeonseo Lee for this one.


Both of those challenges should take me through about about 38 books, which means I'll have 37 other books to complete.  I may double up in some categories or do some of Tim Challies reading challenge to keep me reading books that will grow me throughout the year.

What is on your reading list for 2018?  Any recommendations for me?







When It's Right To "Judge" A Fellow Christian



We went back to our community Bible study group this week, and I am so grateful for this opportunity to get together with other believers and study from God's word.  It's been far too long since I've been involved in a Bible study like this, and I'm reminded of that verse about "iron sharpening iron" (Proverbs 27:17).  The discussion time challenges me to think a little more carefully about different biblical topics.

This week the theme that stood out to me was "judging".  We talked about it in Bible study, and then I read this article that brought it to mind again (written from a Catholic perspective, so I don't agree with some things he says, but the underlying point made me think).  

I have thoughts.


18 Books I Would Recommend From My 2017 Shelf



At the end of December, or the first week of January at the latest, everyone posts their favorite books from 2017.  But the fact that I'm posting mine now, solidly in the middle of January, just means that it will stand out more, right?  I'm going to pretend the late date of this post was done purposefully for this reason!  Aren't I so smart?

This last year was a pretty good reading year for me, overall.  I didn't read too many duds, and I have a fairly substantial list of books I think were well worth my time, and yours!  Let's just get started, because this will be a long post.  

The non-fiction list is much longer than the fiction list.  I'm hoping to read more end-of-year-post worthy fiction in 2018.  Click on the links to read my more extensive reviews on Goodreads (including content warnings where applicable).

Non-Fiction

Strange Fire: The Danger Of Offending The Holy Spirit With Counterfeit Worship by John MacArthur

I had been reading this book through 2016, and finally finished it in 2017.  This book is basically a critique of the modern charismatic movement, particularly the branches that are theologically and biblically unsound (I'm not saying everyone who labels themselves "charismatic" would fall in this group, but it is worth a careful evaluation).  I think MacArthur comes off a bit harsh at times, but I couldn't disagree with anything he said, and I think there is definitely reason for concern about the charismatic movement.  Worth a read because we all should have our eyes open on these issues.


I listened to this as an audiobook, and I regretted not buying a paper copy because I would have been highlighting all over the place!  I love how Wilkin walks us through different pitfalls to avoid in studying the Bible and outlines a sound method for Bible study.  The paperback is definitely on my list to buy, so next time I can go through it with highlighter in hand.


I wish this book was a little more focused so I could give a better summary of it here, but I guess I'll just say that it addresses problems with women's ministries and the way women are often viewed in church, all mixed in with a call to discernment.  It got five stars from me specifically because of the challenge to discernment, and it made me realize the areas that I have been a little lazy with discernment.


One of my more intellectual reads of the year, this book series presents different world religions and what they believe, but does it from a biblical perspective.  It presents Christianity, how these different religions differ from the Christian belief system, and how to witness to people who may be involved in these different religions.  I'm collecting this whole series for my own information, and also to use as a religion/apologetics study for my kids when they reach high school.


This book tackles some tough topics surrounding gender, but I thought it was biblically grounded and really deep.  It gave me so much to think about, and I particularly found the chapter on motherhood to be encouraging.


One of those books that made me want to say "THANK YOU!" throughout, but it also made me think about many of these stories from the Bible in a different way.  Very grounded in a proper interpretation of Scripture, and I thought his tips for avoiding misinterpreting Scripture were right on.



The information in this book was based on a survey of adults who went to church as a child but no longer do, and it was completely fascinating.  Lots of solid information here that parents can apply to training their children, picking a church, etc.  It also may have you thinking about ways you may have compromised God's word, and how that might be affecting your kids.  A great, and possibly convicting, read.


A pleasant reading surprise, this book talks about the biblical view of work, and how our work in the home (which often seems mundane) brings glory to God.  I wished I had read this a year earlier when I was struggling with no longer working outside the home!  I listened to the audiobook and will probably be listening to it again.


One of my reading goals for 2017 was to read more about the Cold War.  I got distracted by the whole having-a-baby thing and didn't read as much as I wanted to on this subject, but I did read this book and it sucked me in!  A narrative non-fiction from a former KGB spy.  It was fascinating to read about the process of becoming a spy, and I loved that it ended with his testimony of coming to Christ.  Great read!


This was another one of my pleasant surprises of the year.  I had never heard about this author, and was unsure of this book, but it was excellent!  A solid look at the history of the Bible, why we can trust the it is the Word of God, and lots of great Bible Study tips!  I'll be reading this one again.


I didn't agree with every point in this book, but overall I found Merkle's message really encouraging! I love the idea that we as women could do so much more with our work in the home if we would just throw ourselves into it, instead of pining after the same roles as men.  And Merkle has quite a high view of women and their abilities that is evident in this book, so don't get your hackles up before you give it a read.  I'll probably be coming back to this one.


This was a really fascinating look at the feminist movement and some of the consequences that we are just starting to see now.  This made an interesting companion read to Eve In Exile because it looked at feminism from a slightly different perspective.  Of course I liked both of these books because I am decidedly not a feminist in the modern sense, so if you consider yourself a feminist, prepare to be challenged (and probably offended).  Just warning you now.



Fiction

Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig

This one was difficult to read because of emotional reasons, and it had some content issues, but I don't know, I thought it was worth mentioning here.  The story follows an autistic girl in the foster system, and her struggles to find her "forever home".  Sweet and suspenseful, sad, but the ending was hopeful and I liked that.

The Wednesday Wars by Gary Schmidt

Have you ever watched "The Wonder Years"?  This book reminded me of that show, except I like this book better!  Holling Hoodhood finds himself stuck in class alone on Wednesday afternoons with a teacher who doesn't seem to like him, but we get to see how his studies and activities on those Wednesday afternoons help him grow up over the course of the year.  I loved this book so much I went right out and grabbed the companion book, Okay For Now.

Okay For Now by Gary Schmidt

I loved this book too!  Similar in type to The Wednesday Wars, this one follows Holling's friend Doug as he moves to a new town.  Doug stumbles upon the library and an original volume from Audubon, and between learning to draw the birds and his friendship with the girl he met in front of the library, he starts to make the most of his less than ideal circumstances.  The ending of this one seemed just right to me, happy, but a little bittersweet too.


This one was purely for fun!  Some content issues, but a funny and happy read.  The main character goes to "Austenland", a resort that puts it's guests into the world of Jane Austen.  I don't think I really need to say more than that.  I also liked the sequel, Midnight In Austenland which was more of a mystery.  Both of these would be fun summer reads!

Flipped by Wendelin Van Draanen

Have you seen the movie?  The book is basically the same as the movie, and I loved them both!  I'm a sucker for a good coming of age story.  

The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton

My first Kate Morton, and basically the best novel I read all year!  (Well, maybe tied with The Wednesday Wars/Okay For Now.)  The main character saw her mother kill a man when she was a teenager, and the story follows her investigation to figure out what really happened that day.  This book will surprise you!  I loved it.

All of these books are ones I would recommend to a friend!  But now, friends, what would you recommend to me? What should I add to my reading list in 2018?  

What were your favorites from last year?



Why I Wear Makeup



The first time I wore makeup I was 13, and I was getting ready to go to an event with my Bible study group.  We had just gone shopping for some back-to-school clothes earlier in the day, and for some reason my mom decided I was old enough for a little mascara.  I remember feeling so grown-up and pretty, headed off the the event wearing makeup for the first time.  There have been many times since then that I was grateful to my mom for introducing makeup and teaching me how to apply it, especially as I grew and encountered people who didn't share my feelings about makeup.

I remember being bewildered the first time I heard someone say they felt makeup was akin to lying.  I also didn't know how to respond when a friend stopped wearing makeup after her daughter was born, saying she didn't want to show her daughter by example that she wouldn't be pretty without it.

Honestly, I'm still not sure what to say about those arguments.  I suppose everyone has their own reasons for wearing, or not wearing, makeup. All I can really speak to is why I, personally, like to wear makeup, so that's what this post is about.  It's not an argument for why you should or should not wear makeup, it's basically some philosophical (and some silly) thoughts from someone who actually likes makeup quite a lot! 

Arguments Against Makeup

First I thought I'd address my take on the two arguments against makeup that I mentioned above, because though those arguments made me stop and think, they didn't make me quit it.

"Makeup is lying.  You are trying to make someone think you look better than you do."  

This argument didn't really stick for me because it's not as if I'm putting on makeup and then trying to tell people I'm not wearing any, that I'm just naturally this beautiful (ha!).  I assume they'll notice that I'm wearing makeup, and I wouldn't really have it any other way. If we're going to use this argument, we might as well extend it to clothes and say that choosing a flattering cut is "lying", and you must wear clothing that shows all your lumps and bumps if you're going to be honest.  Don't brush your teeth with mint-flavored toothpaste, or you might be "lying" by giving someone the idea that your breath naturally smells that good.  Sorry, it just doesn't fly.

"If I wear makeup, my daughters will think they need makeup to be beautiful."  

I was honestly a little taken aback with this argument when I first heard it, and I didn't know what to think.  I can see why my friend started thinking this way, but I came at makeup from such a different perspective that I couldn't agree.  My own mom wore makeup, and she taught us girls how to wear makeup, and I honestly never thought I was less beautiful without it because of something my mom said when she introduced makeup to me.  I vividly remember her telling me that makeup done right doesn't "make you beautiful" but rather enhances the beauty that is already there.  I took that to heart and always approached makeup with that in mind.

Why I Wear Makeup

So without further ado, the reasons I personally wear makeup, and why I'll show my girls how to wear it too.

I think it's fun.  

This is probably the most superficial reason why I choose to wear makeup, but nevertheless, it's true.  Over the years I've experimented with different makeup looks, found my favorite makeup products, and I honestly just find the whole thing pretty satisfying and fun.  For some women makeup is a an artistic expression, and while I wouldn't necessarily say the same thing about myself, I do appreciate the skill it takes to do it right.

I feel more ready for the day with makeup on.  

I got an email newsletter from Diana Kerr (a blogger I follow who is also a life coach) this week, and was reminded of this point.  I've heard it said many times that most people are more productive if they get dressed for the day instead of just staying in their pajamas.  Their brains takes getting dressed as the queue to get started with the rest of the day, and it's harder to get going without it.  Like it or not, makeup has become a similar queue for me.  On days where I don't do my makeup I typically am more tempted to be lazy.  When I wear makeup, I'm more ready to get on with my day and be productive.

I especially like the point Diana made about what effect our taking care with our appearance might have on how we serve the Lord.  Will we use our days to serve Him better when we feel more prepared to face the day?  And does makeup play a part in that?  Not for everyone perhaps, but for me, I think makeup might actually make a difference here too (as weird as it is to type that out).

We live in a sin-cursed world, and that does, unfortunately, affect our faces.  

We age.  We get wrinkles.  We experience sun-damage.  We get tired or dehydrated.  All things that wouldn't necessarily have happened pre-Fall, but things we have to deal with now.  I struggled a bit with this point when sitting down to write this point, because what exactly should we do about this anyway?  Is it just vanity, a "chasing after the wind" to try to counteract the effects of a fallen world on our faces?  It does feel vain in a way, but another part of me doesn't think it is necessarily wrong to try to bring out our natural, God-given beauty even while fighting against the impact of the effects of sin on our skin and hair.

As in so many things, a lot depends upon the attitude with which we use makeup.  Certainly makeup can be used in a vain, prideful way, but does it follow that makeup is always used that way?  I don't really think so.  I read something in Eve In Exile by Rebecca Merkle that made me think about this a little differently.  Running throughout that book is this theme that one area that God often gifts women is an ability to take something and improve it, make it beautiful. Overall, Merkle applied the idea to much more meaningful things, like bringing beauty and reflecting Christ into our homes and families.  But the idea really stuck with me, because I think it explains some of my (and many women's) love of beauty, and desire to take something less then attractive and bring some beauty to it.  That could show up in hobbies like photography or other art forms, in the way we decorate our houses, the way we cultivate gardens, or yeah, maybe even in the way we use makeup.  And I don't really think that's a bad thing, if we can avoid focusing on our own glory in the process of using makeup and rather try to bring glory to God by taking care with our appearance.  Something to think about. I'm still mulling it over.

When Makeup Goes Wrong

I started thinking about this post in the first place because I somehow found myself in a section of the library next to all the books about makeup.  Weirdly, I didn't know there was such a section, even being a fan of makeup myself.  "How fun!" I thought to myself, and grabbed a couple of the books to peruse at home.  

I read a few chapters, and I have to tell you, something just wasn't sitting quite right.  I wondered if I should really be spending all this time thinking about my outward appearance.  Not to be cliche or anything, but there is that whole verse: "Man looks at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart." 1 Samuel 16:7

Now, I don't think that verse is necessarily saying that the way we present ourselves outwardly doesn't matter at all.  There is, after all, the Proverbs 31 woman who looks after the outward appearance of herself and her family, dressing them in "scarlet" and herself in "fine linen and purple", and she is commended for it.  We are representatives of our families and ultimately of Christ to a watching world, so being a slob is certainly not a virtue.  But the idea, talked about further in 1 Peter 3:3-4 is that we should take care to cultivate a good character above worrying about how we look.  

So I started thinking, how does the time allotment compares when it comes to caring for my outer appearance and taking care to cultivate "gentle and quiet spirit which is precious in God's sight"?  Do I spend more time doing my makeup (and fixing my hair and getting dressed) each day than I do reading God's Word?  Maybe that's a problem.  I think the most significant way I use makeup wrongly is by getting distracted by it and focusing too much on my physical appearance.  I often want to look good for other people, so that I will feel good about myself, and so I prioritize applying makeup.  

This is the one reason I wear makeup that I feel is the wrong, and even a sinful, reason.

Going forward, I am hoping to think about these things further and make sure that I am approaching makeup with the right attitude as a Christian woman - and especially making sure I am prioritizing time in God's Word over applying makeup in the morning.  Because a good thing to remember is that for those of us who put our trust in Jesus to save us from our sins, someday this old, sin-affected body will be replaced with a perfect, glorified body, with a glorified face, and there will be no reason to put makeup on.  I think it's fine to wear makeup while I'm here, but it's certainly not the most important thing.  It's infinitely more important to make sure I'm investing in things that will last when makeup no longer matters at all.

So what do you think about all this?  Do you wear makeup?  What role do things like makeup play in our walk with the Lord?







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