The Austen Escape Review



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I've only read one other book by Katherine Reay (Dear Mr. Knightly), and I really enjoyed it, so I was excited for the opportunity to read another one of her books for review!  Though the publisher is Christian, I wouldn't say Reay's novels are Christian or even religious at all - but they are clean, sweet stories, usually with a little romance thrown in.

The Austen Escape is about an electrical engineer, Mary, who has a crush on a consultant at work, Nathan.  She also has a tumultuous relationship with her childhood best friend, Isabel, but Mary ends up going with her to England anyway for an Austen-era experience at a house in Bath.  While they are there, Isabel has a nervous breakdown and thinks she is actually living in the early 1800's, and Nathan shows up to help Mary.  

I would say I enjoyed this book, but I thought it could have been stronger.  While in Bath, Mary works through a lot of her own internal feelings about the way Isabel treats her, but I felt the ending left a lot of things unresolved.  Isabel has a moment of repentance at the end of the story for the way she treats people, but it didn't really feel like she and Mary were fully reconciled.  Through the story we also learn that Mary had emotional problems connecting with her mother growing up, and while I suppose knowing this about Mary added some depth to her character, I didn't really see how that struggle added to the story since there was no realization related to this in the end aside from a brief conversation with her father.

I also felt like the main character was a little hard for me to personally relate to, probably because of personality differences.  Mary's character was very introverted and analytical, and though Reay tries to convince us at certain places in the book that Mary is a "romantic at heart," I didn't get that at all.  Nathan seemed to be the one in the relationship that was more emotionally in tune with Mary.  Though I'm not saying that women can't be analytical or men can't be emotional, I do think that it is a less common relationship dynamic, and somehow with the way it was executed I had a hard time buying it.  

I also felt that some of the relationships with the peripheral characters could have been developed a little better, and it would have strengthened the story.  But then, there was a lot of emotional issues going on in this book, so maybe it would have been too much.  I just know that I would have liked the secondary characters integrated more into the main storyline, and Mary's inner turmoil focused a bit more.

Aside from some of my frustration with the elements listed above, I did actually enjoy the book!  Reay's novels are always slower-paced, but while they take longer to get into, they have a comforting vibe to them.  I also think it could be argued that the multi-faceted emotional side of the characters does add a real-life element to her books, because rarely do we have all of our emotions resolved and tied up into a neat little package in real life.  In that way her characters and situations are really believable.  

I really liked the ending and thought it was nicely done, though I wish I could peek a little further into the future and make sure it all turned out well long-term!  Maybe she'll give us a glimpse of some of her characters in future books? (Katherine Reay, if you are reading, that's a request!  Because I will pick up more of your books in the future.)

Note: I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher in exchange for a review.  This is my honest opinion.
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