Daring To Hope Review: Mixed Feelings



If you haven't heard of Katie Davis Majors, she is a young missionary who went to Uganda when she was 18, ended up staying and starting a ministry, and adopted 13 girls.  I remember reading her first book way back when I was first married.  I don't remember that much about it, but I remember flying through it and being inspired by Katie's devotion to serving the Lord.  So I obviously wanted to pick up her second book that came out this year.

I had mixed feelings about this one.  There were things I liked, and things I didn't.

Things I Liked

First, let me just say, it took me forever to finish this book because for the first half, nearly every chapter left me in a puddle of tears.  Katie picks up the book by telling of her life in a house with her 13 adopted daughters, and how they came to open up their home to people who were injured, dying, or just trying to get on their feet.  The rest of the book is her story of her own struggle to trust in God's goodness while living and personally witnessing so much suffering under her own roof.  It took a lot of vulnerability for her to discuss her doubts in a book like this, and she always comes back to the right conclusions - that God is sovereign, He is good, and even when people are not healed and there are no happy endings, He is working all of it out for the good of those who love Him, and for His own glory.  I think this book could certainly be encouraging to anyone who is struggling with similar suffering or doubts.  It was inspiring to read Katie's thoughts on this subject.

What I Didn't Love

Throughout this book Katie not only shares stories from her life, but she delves into different Bible accounts and relates them back to her own life, and she almost seems to allegorize the biblical accounts in the process.  I'm just not sure I like that - sometimes it worked, and sometimes it sat wrong.  She takes certain biblical passages that were meant for a certain people group at a certain time, and applies them to herself, so the hermeneutics here are questionable.  It also bothered me that her writing in this book is similar to Voskamp's (who also wrote the foreword) in that it sometimes sacrifices clarity for poetry.

Another thing she does frequently is speak about Jesus as if He were standing next to her, whispering in her ear, and she uses phrases like "I heard God say..." followed by a quote.  I don't like it when Christian authors do this.  1) Even if you are intending to use this in a non-literal sense, when you say you heard God speak...well, it sounds like you are saying you heard Him audibly speak those exact words to you.  I assumed Katie was speaking metaphorically, but I think it's a serious thing to claim to be speaking for God (which is what you are doing when you "quote" Him extra biblically), and I think Christians in general should take this a little more seriously.  2) The thing is, God HAS spoken to us, through Scripture, which should be sufficient for us.  I don't like to see authors putting words in God's mouth.

Finally, there were a few cringe-y moments for me when Katie said things like "In the darkest night, I was having a love affair with Jesus" (pg. 121), "I had all but given up on any notion of romantic love in my life outside of my relationship with Jesus" (pg. 164).  I've said it before, and I'll say it again, Jesus is God, the all-powerful Creator and Sustainer of the Universe - JESUS IS NOT YOUR BOYFRIEND.  Yes, we are the COLLECTIVE, figurative bride of Christ, but to reduce His love for us individually to romantic terms is to diminish the greatness of the fact that God Himself chose to love us and die for us.  His love is so much bigger and grander than the "Jesus is my boyfriend" love that Christian women authors often portray.  It's just weird, and I wish Christian women would stop doing it.

There were a couple other little things, but I'll just stop there.

Conclusion

Overall, I liked reading a little more of Katie's story, but her story was definitely buried beneath her own analyzing of biblical accounts and musings on her struggles.  I think reading about her struggles and conclusions could be encouraging for a lot of Christians, so there is value in that.  However, I'd just say to read with your discernment antenna up. This book is mostly grounded in her personal experiences, which like anyone's experiences, are fallible.

Note: I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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Felicia Barkman said...

I am so there with you - Jesus is not your boyfriend and it's super weird and icky to call him that!

Emily said...

Interesting! While her story seems to be amazing, I would be bothered by what you mentioned as the negatives. I think I'll pass :)

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