Honeysuckle Dreams Review



Sometimes you just need a book that doesn't make you think too hard, to read purely for fun, and Denise Hunter's books are usually that for me. I don't know why, but I always get sucked into her stories.

In this book, Brady's estranged wife has just died, and he learns that his baby son may not actually be his. The baby's grandparents are suing for custody, and Brady is desperate to keep his son. After a misunderstanding with an engagement ring, his friend, Hope, is mistaken for his fiancé - and then they start to think that maybe an arranged marriage may not be a bad idea, for a chance at keeping the baby, and for Brady and Hope themselves.

My usual complaint about Hunter's books is that the relationship between her characters is sometimes too focused on the physical, but I thought she did a better job in this book of making the characters appreciate each other's character and personality. There was still some of the descriptions of their "chemistry", and references to their sexual relationship after they are married, but I thought the overall focus of the story was on other things.

One thing I didn't love was how the characters sometimes bordered on dishonesty. After the initial confusion with the engagement ring, Brady doesn't tell the truth right away. His wording in one of the courtroom scenes is questionable. Since it's a Christian fiction book, I just wished that there were some repercussions or lessons to be learned related to the dishonesty, but that was missing. 

Overall I really liked these characters, and the way their story played out. The baby was also really adorable. I do wish the story had ended better - instead of tying them together as a family, I felt like the ending was too focused on Hope's career. She got married because she wanted a husband and to start a family, and then her triumphant moment at the end is to go back to school for her doctorate. This decision at the end just didn't seem to fit the goals of her character throughout the rest of the book, in my opinion. Nothing necessarily wrong with getting her doctorate, but it felt like a discordant note.

It was the light read I was looking for though, and if you need a palette-cleanser book, I'd be curious to see what you think.

Note: I received a copy of this book for free in exchange for an honest review.
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