Showing posts with label Reviews. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Reviews. Show all posts

Of Stillness And Storm



2/5 stars

So I just finished this book, and I'm sitting here with my mind whirling, trying to decide how to describe it.  I'm torn between knowing what the author's aim was and thinking she accomplished her goal really well, and also thinking that I am not completely thrilled with the final tone of this book.

I was going to try to keep this spoiler-free, but then I realized that if it were me reading this review, I would want enough spoilers to decide if it was going to be a book that was worth reading to me personally.  So there are some slight spoilers below.  You've been warned.

What I Liked

The best way to describe this book is a cautionary tale, on three fronts, and I guess what I liked about the book was that the author got her points across in a really powerful way.  

1. The first is a cautionary tale about what can happen when Christians put a supposed call to ministry ahead of their families.  This book follows Lauren and Sam as they meet, fall in love, and have a baby...then as they proceed onto the mission field.  However, it becomes clear pretty early on that "the call" is really Sam's exhaustive drive to bring about his own vision of what he wants to do with his life - and to bring his family along without regard to whether they are also feeling the same "call".  The results are disastrous and heartbreaking.  We watch Ryan, a happy six year old, slowly descend into a sullen teenager who feels rejected by his father in favor of Nepali villagers, and consequently rejected by God.  This brings him to a very dark place, and he attempts suicide.  This was especially hard for me to read, since I currently have a happy six year old.  However, I thought this is where the author made her point so well. The first ministry that we are given by God is to our own family, and any other ministry comes second to that...and mixing up the order can destroy lives and even faith.  This book is a sobering story, even chilling.

2. The second cautionary tale was about how easily one can slip into an emotional affair if they aren't careful.  In the process of the story, Lauren starts communicating with a childhood friend, and eventually becomes so infatuated or in love with him that it has negative effects on her marriage and family.

3. The third caution seems to be about submission, and how a wrong understanding of it can lead wives to submit to things that they know in their hearts go against God's plan.  This happened when Lauren kept submitting to Sam's missionary plans instead of listening to the Holy Spirit's still small voice that told her this wasn't right.  Unfortunately, Sam's character in this book is pretty single-minded in the worst way when it comes to the getting on the mission field (and though the book doesn't say it, I think it's for his own glory, not God's), and if Lauren stood up to him he would have gone without her.


What I Didn't Like

Appropriately, what I didn't like about this book can also be separated under those three points the author was trying to make.

1. First, with regards to priorities in ministry - I felt that in the process of making this point, the author didn't do a satisfactory enough job (to me) in clarifying that God does not call us to sacrifice our families for the sake of ministry.  The book talked about how Lauren and Sam neglected Ryan, but I thought the author could have done a better job explaining how Sam's "call" really wasn't from God if Sam was willing to sacrifice his family for his own idea of what mission work should look like.  Phoenix attempts to show this in the end when she writes about how Lauren turns back to "her God", the God who loves His children and is grieved by all they excused in His name, as opposed to "Sam's God".  But it wasn't quite good enough for me, because it wasn't God at all who "called" Sam to abandon his family, and I wish that was shown more clearly.

2. Second, on emotional affairs - I felt that what Lauren did was never really presented as wrong.  Sure, Sam was totally neglecting and disregarding his family for his own glory, but I still think Lauren should have been more on guard, and at least recognized what she did wrong with regards to getting so involved with Aidan.  I don't feel like she ever did.  We as the reader are just left to our own devices on the morality of her emotional affair (note: it's not okay).  The consequences are seen, but the repentance is not.

3. Third, I kind of hate how this book threw in phrases like "the tyranny of submission", without really explaining more about biblical submission.  It makes submission the bad guy, when really I think it was a misapplication of submission.  I don't think the command for wives to submit to their husbands involves standing by and doing nothing while your child is neglected and goes down a dangerous path because of his parents' poor choices.  Lauren's character acted like she was helpless because of "submission", when really she just didn't want the conflict that would result if she stood up for what God was showing her about the effects of Sam's plan on their family.  And instead of seeking God about her struggle, she just distracts herself with her emotional affair (see above).  Not a great example of biblical submission at all, and maybe that was the point, but again, I wish it was clarified more.

Conclusions

I'd also just like to note that while there was a lot of talk of "reaching" people, there wasn't a lot of talk about what the characters were trying to reach them with.  Only passing references to the Gospel and Christ, but the characters themselves didn't seem to personally recognize what Christ did in dying to take away our sins and rising again, not in a way that impacted their lives - they were just going through the motions of "ministry", either to keep the peace (Lauren) or to do something "great" (Sam).  

Once again, maybe that was the point, but the bottom line is, I wouldn't recommend this to someone who didn't already know what it means to believe in Jesus to take away our sins, or have a strong foundation in their knowledge of what it means to be saved.  I appreciated what the author was trying to do here in presenting us with the perils of jumping recklessly into missions, but only because I am grounded in my faith.  For someone who doesn't really know what Christianity is about, this book presents a very negative view of "Christian" intentions gone amuck.  

I wish the salvation message had been presented more clearly through the ending in this story in case any non-believers pick it up, because without that this book lacked a shot of the Truth that I felt it desperately needed.  I wouldn't necessarily recommend it because of that.  I would recommend it with caution to believers in Jesus if they want a book that gets them thinking about the kind of struggles missionaries may face, and a book that gives a good shot in the arm about the importance of ministering to your own family - but don't expect to leave this book feeling encouraged, because you will be disappointed.

Note: I received a copy of this book for free in exchange for a review.  This is my honest opinion.

Silent Songbird Review (It Wasn't Great)



2/5 stars.

I picked The Silent Songbird by Melanie Dickerson because I love a good fairytale retelling, and I had never read one of Dickerson's before. However, I have to admit, I skimmed the second half of the book because it just didn't grab me and I found myself getting annoyed at a few things.

Positives

I really liked the idea of this story, which was somewhat of a fairytale retelling...the main character was like a mix of Ariel from The Little Mermaid and Merida from Brave (let's just ignore the fact that both of those are at the bottom of my list of favorite Disney Princesses).  The bones of the plot had a lot of potential.  The part I liked best about this book was that I thought the author did a pretty good job of incorporating faith into this book in a really natural way, including a brief presentation of the Gospel.  A lot of times this feels forced into Christian fiction, but I thought it was done pretty well in this book.


Negatives

There are a few reasons I wouldn't recommend this book.

(One) - I didn't like the way this book represented men.  For the most part, all the male characters were either villians, had questionable character, or were made to look ridiculous or unreasonable at some point. This was also reflected in the way some of the female characters talked about men.  The only man who was not portrayed negatively was Westley, and even he was made to look occasionally clueless. 

They also made him apologize to Eva a little excessively, in my opinion.  Why does he have to apologize for not unquestioningly accepting her word?  He didn't even know her!

(Two) - I also found many (really, a lot) of the situations in this book really not believable.  If Westley was supposed to be some sort of a noblemen, I just don't think he would be fraternizing so much with the servants in his house.  Whenever anything happened to Eva, he was always right there.

One particular scene stood out as a little ridiculous to me.  Eva is practicing her archery (and of course Westley happens to be there), and a friend of Westley (who Eva saw trying to kill Wesley earlier in the book), comes up and greets them in a friendly way.  Eva swings her arrow around and points it at the man, to "protect" Westley, and accuses and threatens the other man. 

Let's go over why this bugged me: 1) In the real world during this time, I'm pretty sure she would have been fired on the spot for the way she handled that, even if she was right about the man. 2) I hate how this situation made Wesley seem clueless and helpless.  Once again, it felt like a negative view of men being reflected in this scene.  3) I have a HUGE pet peeve about women "protecting" men in fiction or film, with the clueless man standing there doing nothing.  This always seems to me like a cheap ploy to make the heroine seem strong and "empowering", and it just really irks me.  It's a lazy way of making a woman seem "strong".  And I don't know what's particularly strong anyway about foolishly threatening to shoot a nobleman and accusing him without any proof!

And finally, I just have to mention how at one point the characters end up walking, eating food at a festival, and laughing together about how they just fended off the bad guys who almost murdered them.  Like they had just finished watching a movie instead of fighting for their lives! Oh boy.

(Three) - On top of all that, the writing in this book left much to be desired.  The characters felt really one-dimensional, and the plot didn't have a lot of internal tension, it was mostly driven by external situations.  It felt like the author just thought of a bunch of characters and events, and wrote it all out linearly without taking time to paint the scene or develop the characters or relationships.  Many of the scene-shifts were jarring (like the above scene for an example - one minute we're practicing archery, the next we are threatening to shoot somebody, with no real transition or glimpse into Eva's thought process for this rather foolish move).  It also felt like there was a lack of historical research for a book that was supposed to be set in 1300's England.  Dickerson threw in a couple nods to history and a few old English words, and seemed to think that was good enough, but I think even the intended audience of teenagers appreciates a well-researched and well-thought-out book.


Bottom Line - Though this book had the potential to be a cute story, the writing was not great, and the portrayal of men was troubling to me.  I wouldn't recommend this book to adult women because of the lack of depth, and I wouldn't recommend it to the intended audience (preteen/teen girls) because of the (in my opinion) generally negative portrayal of men.

Note: I received a digital copy of this book for free in exchange for a review.  This is my honest opinion. 

A Homeschool Usborne Book Wishlist (First Grade)



One of the most fun things about homeschooling so far has been researching and trying to decide on different curricula.  For Kindergarten we haven't really done a curriculum per se, we've just been working our way through a bunch of different books, doing crafts, and working on reading and math skills.  I haven't quite made up my mind what curriculum we will use for first grade this next year, but I've been searching through different options, and I've come to a conclusion - whatever we pick, I want to use (or build) a curriculum that uses real books.



We got Wyatt the Usborne Children's Encyclopedia for Christmas, and he poured over it for two days.  He asked me questions about all the pictures, and I told him what the words on the page said, and he was just fascinated.  It was so fun to watch him learning just for the joy of it.  While I think we will follow some sort of curriculum, I want to make sure we have plenty of interesting books around that fit in with what we are learning, to make the whole year more fun.

I've been making book lists galore, but today I wanted to focus on Usborne books!  A friend of mine, Brittney, asked me if I would host an Usborne Facebook party, and it sounded like a lot of fun - so I've been going through their thousands of books and making a list of the ones I'd like to get for school next year.  I'll share the ones I'm thinking about getting, but first, let's talk quickly about the ones I have, shall we?

Usborne Books We Already Have




The Children's Encyclopedia - Like I said above, this one has been a hit.  I think it's the full-page gorgeous illustrations that have really sucked Wyatt in.  I'm not going to lie, there were a few pages I felt the required more explanation (like the world religions or aliens pages), but they are easy enough to skip if you don't agree with or your child isn't ready for some of it.







How Things Work - This book is just so cool.  It's a flap book, and under each flap it gives pictures and descriptions about how the different things in this book work. 






Horses & Ponies and Weather - I bunch these together because they are the same type of book.  These books have fun illustrations and less text because they are meant for younger readers - but I love it because the few words are used really well, and these books get a lot deeper into the topics than you would expect them to.  They have a bunch of these on different topics, and I'm hoping to get more!




Birds Pocket Book - Have I mentioned that our family is really into birds?  We don't know a lot about distinguishing birds, but we would like to learn more.  All of my kids love flipping through the Audubon bird app on my phone, and this is like the book form!

Starting Chess (not pictured) - I forgot I had this one until I sat down to start typing!  Derek is very good at chess, and I picked this up as a supplement for when Wyatt is ready to start learning (which probably is sooner than I think).

So those are the books I have, now on to the books I want.

Usborne Books On My Homeschool To-Buy List

These are the books that I would love to have as we introduce different subjects over the next few years, in addition to the ones I already have.


Science And Nature

The Outdoor Book - I think we would love this for ideas of activities to do outside and nature study!

Human Body Reference Book and Shine-A-Light Human Body Book - This is my area of interest (biology), so I think this looks fun.  And the shine-a-light book adds an interesting element!

Poisonous Animals (etc.) - This is one of those great books for young readers!

How Things Grow - I think I need this book to help my black thumb.

Astronomy And Space Reference Book - I don't know if I even need to explain this. Yay for space!

100 Science Experiments - Someone told me I need this, and I think I do!

History

Big Picture Atlas - I think this will be good for context with different historical events.

Living Long Ago - I'm still not sure my kids grasp how different life was 200 years ago, so this looks great!

Christopher Columbus - One of the few American history books.  Usborne, I know you are British, but more on the American History front please!

See Inside Exploration And Discovery and The Story Of Inventions - These looked really interesting to me.


Reading and Writing

Illustrated Grammar And Punctuation - We are a way off from needing this yet, but my grammar nerd is coming out!  I love this idea!


Illustrated Classics: Huckleberry Finn And Other Stories - This is one of a few classics collections that are condensed and rewritten for young readers, and I am really curious about them.


Miscellaneous (aka. Just For Fun)

Over 50 Secret Codes - I would have loved this as a kid.

Fingerprint Activities: Animals - This just looks adorable, and would be so fun for everyone, including the little two!

First Book About The Orchestra - The kids love Maestro Classics (#affiliate), and I think this book would be a great visual to understand the different instruments.

Big Keyboard Book - We are still hoping to teach our kids how to play the piano, and this looks useful!



I could go on, but you get the idea! There are just a lot of really fun books.  Clearly it's probably going to take me longer than the next year to collect all these!  Maybe I should retitle this post "Usborne Books For Early Elementary", because I think all of these will last well beyond first grade!

Now for a little plug - the Facebook party is tomorrow night at 8 PM EST, and Brittney has a bunch of fun things planned - including a drawing for a book prize!  So if you want to check Usborne out, this is a good chance! If you comment below saying you want to join, I'll send you an email to add you to the party!  Or if you have your eye on something and want to buy without attending the party...can you purchase through any of these links and select my eShow on the left before checkout? Because then I can earn discounts on books! (Shameless plug, I know.)  Party is open until next Monday!

Do any of you have some Usborne books?  What would you recommend to me for the elementary school years?  

I'd love to hear!




P.S. Brittany also made me this handy graphic for Usborne books that go with different curricula!  Pin this!






I Suffered Through This One



1/5 stars.

I snagged this book because I have been listening to a lot more audiobooks over the last year while I work on other things.  This one peaked my interest because I like a good food-related fiction book every now and then.

Bottom line - I kind of suffered through this book.  Not for any one reason, but for a bunch of things, and I honestly found myself skipping chunks toward the end of the book just to get through it quicker.  Read below if you must know why.

Language: Several uses of the f-word, other curse words, and Jesus' name in vain (which I never appreciate as a Christian).

Sexual Content: From the very start of the book we learn that the main character is having an affair with a married man, and generally sleeps around a lot.  That kind of soured the book for me right from the start.  No lesson ever seemed to be learned related to this relationship either, even though I think people generally agree that having an affair with a married man is not a good thing.  Other sexual references. An extended and pretty explicit sex scene that I skipped past.  Another almost sex scene.  I honestly started skipping through the book after this because for other reasons I list below, I was just so tired of this book.

Politics:  Spoiler Alert - near the end of this book the main character finds out she's pregnant, and the doctor presents her with her "options".  Then we have an extended debate about whether she'll abort or not, including an older lady who suggests some herbs that could "take care of it" (an older lady who had an abortion earlier in her life and regrets not having children, so it felt like a weird character to have giving her this talk).  I am strongly pro-life and know that abortion ends the life of an unborn child, so I just cannot stomach casual abortion talk like this in my books.  Thankfully the character decides to keep her baby, but the serious abortion consideration put a sour taste in my mouth.

Plot:  This was my main problem with the book - there was really just no plot to speak of for most of the book.  I kept waiting for something big to happen, but there was just nothing until the character found out she was pregnant, and you already know I wasn't thrilled with all the abortion talk.  Even after that one big plot point, the book seemed to move slowly.  I guess you could say this book was more character-driven, but I typically don't like audiobooks that are character driven.  I need a clear plot to drive the book forward when I am listening on audio, or I have a hard time paying attention.

Characters: The second prong of my disappointment was that I liked none of the main characters in this character-driven book.  From the start I felt like the protagonist was unlikable.  I felt like her personality kept changing, and I couldn't decide if it was the author's fault or the narrator's fault (I'm thinking a little bit of both).  Was she supposed to be high-spirited and sarcastic, or introverted and reflective?  I guess she could be both, but I felt like it was hard to see her growth in the book because I couldn't figure out who she was to begin with.

My second beef with the characters - the two main characters were so immature (once again, was this the author's fault or the narrator's fault?  I don't know!).  If I had read the book without any ages being mentioned, I would have guessed early twenties...but no, the girl was 32, and the guy was almost forty.  This was a big pet peeve of mine in this book.  I felt like both of them should have had their lives together, or at least had a direction, at this age.  Maybe almost-forty-year-olds aren't really expected to have their life together in this culture anymore?  But in fiction, I like my characters to be a little more age-appropriate.

Narrator:  I don't think I would have liked this book much even if I had read it on paper, but to me the narrator didn't do a lot for this book.  And I think that is honestly just a personal thing.  I didn't like the way she read certain lines (I think she added more sarcasm than I would have gotten from print, and her dictation made the main character feel more stuck up).  Her voice for the male characters came off as creepy to me as well (in all fairness, I think a lot of female narrators have this problem though, at least to me).

What I Liked: The positive about this book was definitely all the food descriptions.  Whenever I listened to it I would start to get hungry, and nothing I ate seemed quite up to snuff after hearing about all the food in this book! Books like this make me want to bake and cook more, which is a good thing because sometimes I need that extra motivation.

The ending was sweet, as it seemed like the main character finally found a place where she belonged and got the guy, so it all worked out.  I do love a happy ending.  However, this book was just really not for me.

Note: I received a copy of this audiobook for free in exchange for a review.  This is my honest opinion.


The Best Classroom Valentines


(Some affiliate links in this post.)

Last week I shared our crayon-melt valentine gifts, and some Minted Valentine's cards to go with them.  Well, after much deliberation, I made up my mind and chose some cards for the kids to hand out to their friends! Minted had some great coloring/melted themed cards, but in the end, these are the designs that were calling my name for the kids, and I just decided to go with it.  

I was not disappointed!  The cards came and they are so cute! The quality is also excellent, and I'm almost sorry to waste them on preschoolers (but their moms will appreciate them).





Clyde is so into anything transportation-related, and I thought this message was adorable for all his little two-year-old classmates! 




I did let Wyatt have a choice between a couple different invitations, and this is the one he picked!  He liked the airplane on it, and I thought this was the perfect card for a six-year-old boy to hand out to his friends!






And then Gwen's.  I just knew it had to be pink!  My favorite part of this card is the gold pressed foil lettering on the front.  It's so fancy! For Gwen's card I also decided to try out the tic-tac-toe backer, and now I'm kind of regretting that I didn't choose it for the boys too - it's so fun!




So there you go, those are the cards my kids will be handing out to their friends! If you are ever in the market for classroom valentine cards, keep Minted in mind!  Their quality can't be beat, and these designs were just a few of the dozens of adorable options!

Where do you buy valentines for your kids? Are you going with a theme, or just whatever strikes your fancy (like me)?



Note: I received the above valentines for free from Minted in exchange for a review.  This is my honest opinion.

Our Valentine Gifts For 2017 (And 10 More Card/Gift Pairings)



I never really considered myself a "people pleaser".  I fancy myself one of those people who wouldn't change my own opinions or convictions just to please someone else, and I always thought I had pretty good boundaries.

But I realized last year that no, I am kind of a people pleaser.  The way it manifests itself for me is a difficulty in saying "no".  This really became a problem this last fall.  All of a sudden I had several writing commitments and other commitments at church, and barely time to breathe!  

Unfortunately because of this busyness, I decided I needed to let some things go, and one of those things was co-hosting the With Grit & Grace Linkup.  However, I don't see any reason why I can't still share what I want to work on each month!  As far as goal-setting goes, you all already know that I'm not a resolution-making, goal-setting kind of girl.  When I pick a goal for the month, it's one thing, and usually a bit vague at that.  Another blogger wrote recently about how she accomplishes more when her goals are vague - and even though all goal-setting experts say that vagueness is a no-no, I find the same thing is true of me. 

So here is my one, not-super-specific goal for February.

I want to give Valentines!  

To whom?  I don't fully know yet.  However, this goal fits in with my larger focus for the year, and it's also something I just want to do.  I have a hard time with the love languages concept, because I feel like I could claim all of them as a personal love language, but I do enjoy giving gifts, even small gifts.  I like to make my own gifts occasionally too, especially when they are simple.  It makes my non-crafty self feel like I'm not a complete failure in the DIY area!







(Affiliate links below.)



Especially every year around Valentine's Day, I get the urge to make something, which is convenient because Valentine's Day is a great creative outlet! This is one of the things I came up with for the kids to give their friends this year.  Did anyone have some of these crayon melts growing up?  I wrote a whole post once about my first-grade crayon melt wishes.  We have a bunch of broken crayons around, so I bought a heart mold, melted the crayons in the oven, and let them cool completely before I removed them!  

They turned out pretty well, and I am planning on making enough for all the kids' little friends.  I'm still looking for the perfect valentines to include with the crayon melts though!  I've had the opportunity to work with Minted in the past, and this year they gave me a chance to pick out some classroom valentines.  Oh my goodness.  The choices are endless because every single one is so cute!

To help you out in your valentine-giving efforts, I put together a few ideas for little gifts to include with some of Minted's classroom valentines.  But do yourself a favor and check out the entire collection, because there were so many cute ones I didn't have room to share here!  (Also, I'll take feedback on which one you think goes best with the crayon melts.  As I type this, I'm still not sure which ones to pick.)




Firefly Love Valentine - This is a great Valentine for glow sticks, or glow-in-the-dark anything, really.


Banner Takeoff Valentine - I have given airplane gliders as valentine gifts in the past, and this one is the perfect valentine for that!


Sharp Student Valentine - Cool pencils would go with this one.  You could even include a sharpener if you wanted to add something extra.



Bee My Valentine - Minted has a few adorable bee-themed valentines, and if it were me, I'd include a honey stick!


Precious Gems Valentine - So many possibilities with this one.  Ring pops, gem-shaped erasers, plastic jewelry.


Sweet Bubbly Valentine - A bubble gum valentine! Tuck a stick of gum in with it, and there you go!


You Rule Valentine - Colorful plastic rulers, obviously.


School Of Fish Valentine - You could go with gold fish (the crackers), or any sort of fish toy with this one.


Color In My World Valentine - Crayons, and the valentine recipient can finish coloring this one themselves!  Minted has a few valentines that are also activities, like this one.  This one might be a contender for our crayon melts.



Bugs And Kisses Valentine - I would go with inexpensive plastic bug toys or magnifying glasses with this one.  This is also a great example of one of the activity valentines!



Smart Cookie Valentine - Bake some cookies!



The bottom line is that you could choose almost any valentine treat or theme, and Minted probably has a classroom valentine choice that will go with it!  I seriously had a horrible time narrowing down which valentines to show you in this post - it's going to be even harder to pick the ones I want for my kids to hand out.  I'm still debating on whether I'll stick with the "melted" theme, or not!

Do you hand out Valentine's (for your child's class maybe?).  
Am I having a little too much fun with this?  I have this sneaky feeling that putting together Valentine's gifts for other people's kids is supposed to be burdensome, but I think it's so fun!

(And just as a little bonus - check out these Valentine-inspired prints!  Perfect for a gallery wall or as a Valentine's gift for a grown up.)

(I love a beautiful vow print - I have one on our wall!)

(You can customize this print with your own photo.)



Stay tuned and I'll update in a week or two on which valentines I picked to go along with the crayon melts!








Note: I will be receiving Valentine classroom cards to review in exchange for this post.  This is my honest opinion.





© Through Clouded Glass. Design by MangoBlogs.